Five Best Careers for Introverts

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Check out these five careers that could be a good fit for your introverted personality.

By Danielle Blundell

Door-to-door sales, networking, small talk...

Sound cringe-worthy to you?

It might be time for you to switch to a career that's better suited for your introverted nature.

Good news: There are plenty of careers where an introverted personality is viewed as a strength, not a weakness. 

The key, says Eileen Sharaga, a New York City-based career management specialist, is for introverts to find a behind-the-scenes role in an industry they're interested in.

Ready to learn more about careers that just might embrace your introverted personality? Read on for our list of five careers fit for introverts.

Career #1: Accountant

Are you a math whiz who enjoys reading over your bank statements and balancing your checkbook? Consider accounting as a good career fit.

In addition to examining financial statements, accountants generally develop ideas to reduce costs and increase revenues, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Introvert-friendly features: 

  • "Accountants spend most of their time tracking data and understanding trends, so that attracts introverts," says Sharaga.
  • If you want to spend more time with "the books" versus people, this might be the gig for you. According to the Department of Labor, accountants often spend their time inspecting account books and preparing and examining financial records.

Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.

Education options: Think that this career might fit your introverted personality? According to the Department, most accountants need at least a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field. But note that "some employers prefer to hire applicants who have a master's degree, either in accounting or in business administration with a concentration in accounting," adds the Department.


Career #2: Computer Systems Analyst

Does working closely with computers on a daily basis sound like a career match made in heaven? If you answered yes, consider looking into computer systems analyst positions.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, an analyst might get intimately acquainted with a company's information technology system to determine whether new computer programs could help the business run more efficiently. In fact, analysts typically put together an analysis of costs and benefits to help management figure out if computer upgrades are financially worthwhile.

Introvert-friendly feature: 

  • While it's true that you may have to check in with management from time to time, the daily grind involves a lot of alone time, including "sitting at a computer and crunching numbers," says Sharaga.

Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.

Education options: "A bachelor's degree in a computer or information science field is common, although not always a requirement," according to the Department of Labor. But some analysts only have an associate's degree as well as experience in a related field, adds the Department.


Career #3: Medical Records and Health Information Technician

Interested in one day working in health care but don't want to deal with patients directly? Consider pursuing a career as a medical records and health information technician.

Technicians are usually the ones responsible for keeping health records and other sensitive data under wraps, says the U.S. Department of Labor, assigning classification codes to represent diagnoses and treatments.

Introvert-friendly features:

  • Sharaga depicts it as "a show up, sit at the computer, and do your work kind of job."
  • Instead of directly interacting with sick and elderly patients, technicians could spend most of their time coordinating patients' records to ensure their timeliness, accuracy, and completeness, according to the Department of Labor.

Click to Find the Right Health Information Technology Program.

Education options: Want to give this introvert-friendly career a go? The Department says that technicians typically need a postsecondary certificate in health information technology, but some candidates may have an associate's degree. And keep in mind that many employers prefer to hire technicians with professional certification.


Career #4: Graphic Designer

Looking for a creative outlet where you could work on your own? Consider a career as a graphic designer.

So, what does a typical workday look like? According to the U.S. Department of Labor, your time spent at the computer or sketching on paper typically includes developing artistic content for clients' product illustrations, logos, or websites.

Introvert-friendly features: 

  • "As a graphic designer, you're working out your ideas in graphics all day long," says Sharaga.
  • Many graphic designers work independently, and some even telecommute, according to the Department of Labor.

Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.

Education options: According to the Department, a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field is usually required. But if you already have a bachelor's degree in another subject, you could pursue technical training in graphic design to qualify for some positions, adds the Department.


Career #5: Computer Programmer

Do you consider yourself a computer geek who is looking for a more behind-the-scenes role? A career as a computer programmer could be right up your alley.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, common duties could include using computer languages like C++ and Java to write software programs, updating current programs, and fixing any errors in the code.

Introvert-friendly features: 

  • As a computer programmer, you might be "sitting all day at a computer writing programs that require technical skills," says Sharaga.
  • According to the Department of Labor, programmers generally work alone and often telecommute.

Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.

Education options: Most computer programmers have a degree in computer science or a related field, says the Department. And while a bachelor's degree is more common, some employers do hire candidates with an associate's degree.

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